What Trump's Win Means for HR

The dust has finally settled after one of the most turbulent election seasons ever. Donald Trump will be the next president of the United States, and Congress remains under Republican control.


These outcomes matter to all Americans—but their relevance to HR is unique. 


As much as we try to separate politics from the workplace, human resources is inextricably linked to the political climate. The fruits of the political process—regulations, laws, and reform—shape HR’s day-to-day responsibilities. Whether you’re stressing over the Cadillac Tax or scrambling to comply with the new overtime rules, the core functions of your job are the direct result of over a century of politics.

The last decade has been marked by a “pro-employee” renaissance in the US—paid family leave, the minimum wage, gender pay equity, and healthcare reform have all become part of the national conversation. States and cities across the country have enacted reforms that were once considered unimaginable, like a $15 minimum wage or 100 percent paid parental leave. While activity on these local fronts has been fast and furious, deep divisions in Congress have largely resigned the federal government to the role of spectator. 


Trump’s historic election marks a turning point. Republicans have been handed the keys to both the executive and legislative branches of government and have a clear path to implementing their vision for future. The workplace is about to change. 

Ahead of Inauguration Day, Namely has published a forecast of what Trump's presidency might hold for workplace issues, including the minimum wage, paid family leave, the Affordable Care Act, and overtime pay. In our report, we do more than simply predict whether laws will pass; we predict what they'll look like after Congress is through with them.


If this past election is proof of anything, it’s that politics in Washington is anything but predictable. With our new report, we seek to cut through that uncertainty and paint a clear picture of the next four years for HR.