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DOL's New Overtime Rules Leaked


March 7, 2019
BREAKING: The DOL has formally published the new rules—this story is developing.
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Unlike your HR team, the nation’s capital isn’t known for keeping secrets—but according to a recent report, the latest “leak” in Washington might pique their interest.

Since 2016, HR and payroll professionals alike have braced themselves for significant changes to the rules governing overtime pay. After years of political and courtroom intrigue, the Department of Labor (DOL) is reportedly ready to make its long-awaited move.

Payroll and Daylight Saving Time

The weekend feels short enough as it is. If you can believe it, this upcoming one will seem even shorter for most of us.

This weekend marks the return of daylight saving time. With it, we will enjoy nearly eight months of additional daylight—meaning you'll soon end your workday with some sun to spare. Like every spring, you'll set your clock ahead one hour this Sunday. But what happens if you have an hourly employee working at that time? How does your payroll team account for the time shift?

How Salary Ranges Can Support Business Growth

If you’re nearing the 50 employee threshold, it’s time to consider implementing salary ranges. Salary ranges are the essential guardrails that help you decide how much you’re willing to pay for new hires and how you plan to reward existing talent—all while keeping your goals and budget in check.

New Jersey Approves New $15 Minimum Wage

With the stroke of a pen, New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy may have just given thousands of state workers a raise.

On Monday, the governor signed legislation (A-15) that will gradually increase New Jersey's minimum wage to $15 per hour. The measure, which sailed through the state’s Democrat-controlled legislature, now makes New Jersey the third-largest state to enact such an increase. New York and California approved $15 minimum wages in 2016.

Pro Sports and Payroll: How Are Athletes Taxed?

It’s game day. The wings are hot, the beer is cold, and mom’s seven layer dip is on point. While your friends are agonizing over the score, the payroll professional in you can’t stop thinking, “How is the away team taxed?” Come on, I know that's going through your mind. 

Retro Pay 101: Payroll Lessons From the Government Shutdown

The absolute worst feeling that a payroll professional can have is finding out someone didn’t get paid.

While that stings for us, it’s even worse for the ones who wake up to an empty bank account on payday. Last week, roughly 800,000 federal employees experienced that due to a partial government shutdown.

Eventually, most of these employees will be paid for their time. And given that the shutdown started back in December, it's a sure bet that payroll professionals like me will be asked to process plenty of retroactive payments. Here’s how those should be handled.

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New 2019 Form W-4 Released, But Concerns Persist

The more things change, the more they stay the same. After months of speculation, the 2019 Form W-4 has arrived—and it isn’t nearly as worrisome as payroll professionals thought it would be.

On December 11, the IRS quietly added the 2019 Form W-4 to its website, unaccompanied by the usual press release. With the exception of a few minor wording changes, the form is virtually identical to the 2018 edition. 

How Does State Tax Reciprocity Work?

Everyone’s heard the saying, “you scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours.” In payroll, when these agreements happen between states, we call them reciprocal agreements. In other words, “you take my tax, I’ll take yours.”

Calling the IRS? Read This First.

The holiday season is known for a lot of pleasant things—eggnog, scented candles, and family time all come to mind. But if you’ve been in the payroll profession long enough, there’s a good chance you associate it with something else: federal and state tax notices. And when those come in, it’s time to pick up the phone. Gulp.

2019 Contribution Limits Released

Call it an annual holiday tradition. Every year, the IRS publishes a new set of contribution limits for a variety of popular benefits, including flexible savings accounts and commuter plans. With a series of announcements spaced over the last several weeks, the agency has finally settled on all major limits for 2019.