Most Recent

equal-pay-dr-19-1

The Secret to Equal Pay? Representation at the Top.

The secret to eliminating the pay gap could be more intuitive than you think.

It’s not news that America has a pay equity problem. Per the latest figures, women earn an average of 80 cents for every dollar earned by men. Non-majority women are at an even steeper disadvantage. Hispanic women earn just 54 cents for every dollar earned by white men.

Nearly sixty years after President Kennedy signed the Equal Pay Act, federal and state regulators are still tinkering with potential solutions. This fall, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) will require employers to report on employee demographics and compensation for the first time.

Over the last five years, one approach has come into vogue: banning salary history questions during job interviews. The theory here is that if future compensation is based on old (and inequitable) information, women and non-majority employees will always be at a disadvantage. As of this writing, 18 states and 17 cities have such a ban in place.

But while there’s certainly potential for these laws to turn the tide, they’ll need to overcome old habits. One anonymous survey found that as many as 80 percent of businesses still rely on pay history when determining what to offer a hire. And there’s some academic work that suggest that it isn’t the salary history question that perpetuates the gap, but inherent biases in how people react when discussing pay with men versus women.

Gender-1

How to Promote Gender Equality in the Workplace

HR professionals can find themselves in a difficult situation when it comes to identifying employee genders. Annual EEO-1 or employee demographic reports limit employee gender to just two options, male and female, but gender identity is often not that black and white. As more employees identify as non-binary, HR teams have to find a balance between compliance and acceptance in their workplaces. 

pride

Your Guide to Pride Month at Work

It’s officially June and there’s already something to celebrate as the nation kicks off Pride Month. As millions of individuals and allies celebrate the LGBTQ+ community, workplaces are looking for ways to support their employees. From legislative wins to employee resource groups, we’ve come a long way in enabling individuals to bring their authentic selves at work—but there’s still a long way to go. 

equalpay-19

Pay Equity Begins With Awareness

Today, April 2, 2019 is Equal Pay Day in the United States. Last year, it was on April 10. In 2017, it was April 4. Why does the date change each year? Well, Equal Pay Day is held every year on the day that women have to work until they earn the income that men earned in the prior calendar year. In other words, women had to work from January 1, 2018 until April 2, 2019 (today) to earn what men earned in the calendar year of 2018.

hrr DandI

6 Can't-Miss D&I Sessions at HR Redefined 2019

Don’t miss these sessions designed to help take your diversity and inclusion efforts to the next level.

comp

How MM. LaFleur Built a Transparent and Equitable Compensation Strategy

I joined MM.LaFleur  -- a clothing brand, styling service and community for professional women—as a People Operations Manager in May 2017. Four years after the company was founded, we were no longer a tiny startup—we had more than 50 employees, and were growing rapidly. As we tried to fill all of our recruiting needs, we lacked the processes to do so effectively. It was like we were trying to build the airplane mid-flight.

Stay Updated

Get the latest news from Namely about HR, payroll, and benefits.

hr-women-salaries

Are Women in HR Paid Fairly?

One of the most pressing issues in HR and employment law is gender pay equity. Across all industries, research shows that women make less than their male colleagues, or 76 cents to the dollar. Because of their influence over employee compensation, it’s often said that HR professionals are best equipped to stomp out the problem.
 

mircoaggr

Identifying and Avoiding Microaggressions at Work

It’s important to remember the impact our words and actions can have on other people, especially coworkers. Sometimes well-intentioned behavior can have unintended consequences. What we view as an off-hand compliment or gesture can be interpreted as an insult or put-down to another person.  Here’s your guide to navigating and avoiding these “microaggressions” in the workplace.

diversity-inclusion

Diversity in the Workplace Starts With the Recruiter

Diversity and inclusion are a top HR priority right now, but what does that really mean? Without an actionable plan in place, it runs the risk of being just one more well-intentioned but poorly realized catch-all phrase, rather than integrated with the complete employee lifecycle.

Notebook1

6 Questions to Ask Before Building Your Diversity Initiative

Today’s employees want to work at organizations that prioritize diversity and inclusion. Sixty-seven percent of job seekers consider diversity when evaluating offers, and more than half of workers believe their employers should be doing more to promote it. That’s why it’s critical to demonstrate why and how you’re working to improve diversity and inclusion at your organization.