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kavanaugh

What Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court Nomination Means for HR

Earlier this month, President Trump announced his latest pick to sit on the Supreme Court: Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh. The nomination, which has garnered praise from Republicans and derision from Democrats, could preserve the Supreme Court’s conservative bent for decades. If confirmed, he would fill the seat left vacant by the retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy.
 

legal

USCIS to Pursue Deportation for Denied Work Permits

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has instituted a new policy in which it will place certain workers into deportation proceedings if their work permit extension requests are denied.
 

paystubs-1

How to Make Sense of Employee Paystubs

Every few weeks, employees receive a slip of paper that details their health insurance premiums, year-to-date 401k contributions, and even vacation and sick time balances. It sounds like the dream HR document, one that’s practical for employees and one that businesses can use to demonstrate value.

ma-min-wage

Massachusetts Passes Historic Minimum Wage, Paid Leave Law

Move over, California. With a flurry of legislative activity last month, Massachusetts has joined the select few states with both a $15 minimum wage and paid family leave program.
 

immigration-1

Navigating Immigration Compliance in the Trump Era

The field of human resources is changing. In our HR Redefined series, we give innovators and experts a medium to share personal reflections, professional advice, and best practice guidance.

trump-merger

Trump Proposes Merging Labor, Education Departments

Call it another nineties reboot. In a move that could throw employers for a loop, the Trump administration has resurrected a 1995 proposal to combine the Departments of Labor (DOL) and Education (ED).
 

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IRS Unveils Major Changes to Form W-4

One of the most important payroll tax forms is set for an overhaul—again.
 

ct-salary-history

Connecticut Bans Salary History Questions

If you’re wondering what the HR compliance trend of the year is, look no further than salary history bans. With a law passed by Connecticut lawmakers this month, the Nutmeg State is set to join the fast-growing list of jurisdictions that have made salary history off-limits during job interviews.
 

Questions

Vermont Bans Salary History Questions

In the Green Mountain State, some questions are better left unasked. Beginning July 1, Vermont employers can no longer ask job candidates to share their salary history. Governor Phil Scott signed Bill H. 294 on May 11 after it passed unanimously through the state’s House of Representatives and Senate.

class-actions

Supreme Court: Employers Can Ban Class-Action Lawsuits

A contentious Supreme Court decision earlier this week has employers and employees taking sides. In a narrow 5-4 ruling, the court ruled that businesses could limit workers’ ability to file class action lawsuits against them. The decision involved three cases where companies required employees to sign arbitration clauses as part of their contracts.